*Monthly Flickr Photo Blog Challenge #2 – Music

Music

Photo © Marco Bozzato

Welcome to the second monthly flickr photo blog challenge!  Marco Bozzato, the winner of last month’s challenge has chosen the theme “Music” which will lay the foundation from which we can build out submissions.  You have until April 30th to submit your musical image to the following Flickr group threads:

 

TRP Photoblography

Mirrorlessons

If you’re not a member of either (or both) group(s), please join us, submit your image and prepare to vote.  Heather and Mat from Mirrorlessons, as well as myself will each choose our favorite from all submissions and on the first of May, we will open up a vote on both of our blogs to allow everyone, and all readers to vote from May 1st through May 5th.  The image and photographer with the most votes will get showcased on both blogs and gets to choose the theme for the month of May.  We had dozens of images submitted for the first challenge, and I’d love to see this continue to grow.  The larger we can build this community both inside and outside of flickr, the larger an audience and family we will have to interact with, learn from and build upon.

So, get your camera out, and get creative.  The only rule is that the image needs to be related to music, and while not an official rule, we like the idea of newly taken images so that we can use these monthly challenges to spur creativity from the ground up.

If you’re not signed up to receive new updates, you can enter your email at the top right of the screen which will merely sign you up to get emailed when new articles are posted, nothing more.  I’ve thought about going into pharmaceuticals or trying to become Nigerian royalty, then looking for eager investors to help separate me from my royal billions, but at this point, I’m so far behind on just keeping the blog up so you’ll only receive relevant emails to photography.  Sorry about that.

Let’s get to it!

Happy shooting,

 

Tyson

*Congratulations to Marco Bozzato for winning our first Flickr Photo Blog Post

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Congratulations to Marco (see more from him HERE) for compiling over half of the overall votes between the poll here and on Mirrorlessons (click HERE to visit Mat and Heather)!  Stay tuned to find out Marco’s choice on our Flickr Photo Blog Challenge topic for April.  To sign up to receive posts as they go live, enter your email at the top right of the page, find me on Facebook here, or Twitter here and find the TRP Flickr group HERE and the Mirrorlessons Flickr group HERE!  It’s all about family, friends and community and I’m very excited that we’re continuing to grow ours.  If you didn’t see the recent eye enhancement tutorial featuring Heather from Mirrorlessons, check it out HERE.

Thanks to all for the continued collaboration, support and conversation.  I look forward to seeing where we can all continue to take this.

 

Take care and happy shooting,

 

Tyson

*Vote now for the winner of our first Flickr Photo Blog Challenge!

Confession time?

“Confession Time?” by Alex O’Neal (clocks-and-clouds on flickr Click HERE to see more of his images)

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“Lux – Arco” by Fernando Pereira (Nando.uy on flickr Click HERE to see more of his images)

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“Magia” by Marco Bozzato (MarcoBozzato on flickr Click HERE to see more of his images)

Thank you to everyone who has submitted their images in our very first joint Flickr Photo Challenge!  Heather and Mat from Mirrorlessons as well as myself have chosen the three we feel did best to tackle the theme of “one light” and you can now vote below.

The poll will be open until this coming Saturday the 5th at which point the photo with the most votes between this poll and the comment thread poll HERE on Mirrorlessons will get to choose our next challenge topic.  Be sure to visit both polls and vote for your favorite!  Click the images above to see more work from each of these photogs, and thank you again to everyone that participated.  I can’t wait to see the next challenge topic.

 

Let Alex, Fernando and Marco know what you think in the comments!

 

Great first month to all!

 

Happy shooting,

 

Tyson

 

*HDR 101, Part 2 – Processing Dynamic Range

My final result

We’ve been out capturing dynamically diverse scenes in Part 1 of the HDR 101 series, now we get them onto the computer and realize that there are a variety of ways to achieve our vision.  From free-ware to thousands of dollars worth of software, there are options.  Some are better than others, and some offer a better bang for the buck (in my opinion).  Regardless, most all HDR software out there will offer you a free trial, so you can decide which works better for your vision.  That said, here are a couple techniques using Photoshop, Everimaging HDR, and a very popular HDR software, Photomatix, along with discount codes if you choose to purchase :)  Read on for more…

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*HDR 101, Part 1 – Capturing Dynamic Range

the scale of luminance values as far as the eye can see…

Politics, Religion, Economics, HDR.  There seems to be little in the photographic world that starts such heated discussions as the concept of HDR photography and processing.  Truth of the matter is, it is a very popular technique and can be done with a multitude of results, some more visually shocking than others, but I believe HDR gets a bad rap too often.  Let me start off by saying, I am not an HDR expert.  I do not feel that my techniques are an end all by any means, but I have figured out some very helpful techniques that I feel can benefit those looking to get into, or better understand capturing and processing HDR imagery.  For me, capturing the dynamic range of a scene is the primary concern while the way these bracketed images are processed is an entirely personal decision.  Too often, I see people tonemapping single images, or running them through an HDR-like software to give it that grungy, gritty look and calling it “HDR.”  While many of those images have a very cool look to them in their own right, it still doesn’t quite qualify as a high dynamic range photo by definition in many cases.  C’mon in and we can discuss ways to capture the whole dynamic range of any particular scene along with some tips and tricks.

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*Floating in Photoshop! How to levitate in a photo.

*Wanted to thank everyone who has stopped by to read this post over the last few years. I’ve received quite a few emails and seen links back to this article from many different forums based in many different countries. Thank you! As originally mentioned in the tutorial below, this isn’t a particularly original tactic, but if you put your own spin on it, it can produce some really cool imagery. Okay, on to my original posting, and thank you again for everyone who has stopped by. I’ve been really excited to converse, learn and meet with many of you since I started this blog over three years ago!

Enjoy,

Tyson

This is not an original idea, but so few ideas are anymore. While it may be a well used tactic, it can be very effective. I’ve played around with this technique a few times and it is one that when done decently will almost always get a “wow!” or at least a “huh, wait, what?” It is easy to do as well. It requires Photoshop, or if you are fundamentally against paying $600 for software you can download GIMP. I’ve used Photoshop for this one, so if using GIMP, you will need to translate these steps into GIMP-speak which shouldn’t be too hard.

Okay, our goal is to appear to be floating, or hovering so unless you’re an accomplished zen levitation master, you will need to take two pictures to create the illusion.

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